North Carolina HEE-HAW!

Elections, we doan need no STINKIN’ ELECTIONS!

Beth Perdue WANTS

“The Obama Way!”

[snip]
“I think we ought to suspend, perhaps, elections for Congress for two years and just tell them we won’t hold it against them, whatever decisions they make, to just let them help this country recover. I really hope that someone can agree with me on that,” Perdue said. “You want people who don’t worry about the next election.”

The comment — which came during a discussion of the economy — perked more than a few ears. It’s unclear whether Perdue, a Democrat, is serious — but her tone was level and she asked others to support her on the idea.

(Full remarks below)

Later Tuesday afternoon, Perdue’s office clarified the remarks: “Come on,” said spokeswoman Chris Mackey in a statement. “Gov. Perdue was obviously using hyperbole to highlight what we can all agree is a serious problem: Washington politicians who focus on their own election instead of what’s best for the people they serve.”

The Republicans sure are taking it seriously as they look to score political points. Here’s a statement from GOP spokesman Rob Lockwood:

“Now is a time when politicians need to be held accountable more than ever. To suspend an election would be removing the surest mechanism that people have to hold politicians accountable: the right to vote. Does the Governor not believe that people of North Carolina have the ability to think for themselves about whether or not the actions of elected officials are working?”

UPDATED: GOP House candidate Paul Coble didn’t think much of Democratic Gov. Bev Perdue’s idea that congressional elections be suspended for two years so Congress can concentrate on the economy.

“That’s a proposal that only the politicians that have worsened our economic mess could appreciate,” said Coble, who is chairman of the Wake County commissioners. “Governor Perdue and the politicians in Washington may fear the message voters send next November.” [snip]

Say what you want, but that isn’t the first bent idea coming from her office.
Perdue does the same for North Carolina as Kunin did for Vermont in the ’80’s. Vermont never recovered.

Perdue’s Comment

“You have to have more ability from Congress, I think, to work together and to get over the partisan bickering and focus on fixing things. I think we ought to suspend, perhaps, elections for Congress for two years and just tell them we won’t hold it against them, whatever decisions they make, to just let them help this country recover. I really hope that someone can agree with me on that. The one good thing about Raleigh is that for so many years we worked across party lines. It’s a little bit more contentious now but it’s not impossible to try to do what’s right in this state. You want people who don’t worry about the next election.”

Given that the Congress does nothing now, why would we want that collection of turkeys not worrying about re-election.

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4 Responses to North Carolina HEE-HAW!

  1. Dr Underhill says:

    The Donk Party is a cavalcade of bungholes.

  2. The Chancellor says:

    Whoa, hold it. What gets lost in all the baked air is the sad fact that very few political figures can form complete sentences, much less ideas. What Ms. Perdue missed was the idea of a one-term limit with a punch list of worthy things that each candidate promises to do in just one term. Compensation would be paid only for each promise fulfilled. Ill-advised wars and economic misfeasance would not count.

  3. Dr Underhill says:

    Leftard cranks like Perdue probably talk this way all the time with other leftard cranks.
    Sometimes they forget when they’re outside the asylum.

    • Peccable says:

      No, this is a parrot of the Orszag’s mumblings. Orszag mouthed this crap:
      I wish it were not necessary to devise processes to circumvent legislative gridlock, but polarization isn’t going away. John Adams may have been exaggerating when he pessimistically noted that democracies tend to commit suicide, yet, as we are seeing, certain aspects of representative government can end up posing serious problems. And so, we might be a healthier democracy if we were a slightly less democratic one.
      See it here at the Economist: http://www.economist.com/blogs/democracyinamerica/2011/09/democracy
      I could have added this to the post but the position of two bungholes isn’t going to make the idea right.